Gee! Lost plots and wet blankets

This one’s either attrocious reporting, bad typesetting or both.

Leeds Times
Saturday 1 May 1841

AN INCORRIGIBLE ROGUE

On Monday last, Gee was committed take his trial for stealing a blanket, belonging to Mr Hill, of Wrenthorpe, near Wakefield. Last week, Gee’s period of confinement in Wakefield House of Correction for offence, expired, and on his road to Bradford, he contrived strip a hedge of the blanket in question. He was seen to come into Bradford with something suspicious tied up bundle, and was seized Charles Ingham, police officer, and the bundle searched, when it was found to contain a wet blanket, and after some inquiries the owner was found, and identified it by several marks.

18410501IncorrigibleRogue

Church plans double tax for township

Ambiguities about boundaries again, in this intriguing paragraph from a London paper on the Vicar of Stanley’s attempt to impose a church rate on the inhabitants of Stanley-cum-Wrenthorpe township. Although the ancient township spread as far west as Foster Ford Beck/Balne Beck, Wrenthorpe was well outside of his parish.

London Sun
Monday 27 December 1841

INIQUITOUS CHURCH-RATE

Three persons recently met in the vestry of Stanley Church for the purpose of levying a church-rate, in addition to the one now attempting to be collected, for the Wakefield district, thus making a double close for the poor Stanley-cum-Wrenthorpe rate-payers. The three individuals present were the Churchwardens and the parson; and these three officials had the audacity and cold-heartedness to impose a rate on their starving neighbours, many of whom are now existing for days together on nothing but common Swede turnips. We know instances of some families who have been fed and life sustained by nothing but this beasts’ food. Shame upon the men who thus attempt to wring money from these poor wretches, to support the overfed and overgrown State Church; and who threaten all who do not, on a certain day, by them appointed, pay this iniquitous demand with the terrors of the Church ecclesiastic. Is there none in this large district to protect the poor from such a disgraceful imposition.

It’d be interesting to follow this story up using primary source material such as surviving churchwardens’ books and township records, to find out if the malicious scheme came about.

A Wrenthorpe ghost story

Yorkshire Evening Post
Saturday 11 September 1937

DIARY OF A YORKSHIREMAN
THE LITTLE OLD WOMAN

I am informed that the truth of the following story is vouched for by a miner’s widow living in Wrenthorpe.

Seven years ago her husband died after a pit accident, and went live an old stone house Wrenthorpe village to be near her father, whose health was failing. Often the early days of her bereavement she would sit the firelight when her days’ work was done, staring into the fire, and whenever she looked across to the armchair on the other side the hearth she could see a figure sitting in it. It was figure of an old woman, with white and rosy cheeks. On her head was white cap with heliotrope bow in the front. A white frill edged the neck of her bodice, and white trills showed at her wrists. She wore a little black satin apron edged with lace, and her hands were folded on her lap.

Every time the widow sat alone in the firelight the little old woman would appear in the armchair opposite. It naturally made her nervous, and she would get up and light the gas. When she told her father about the apparition, he only laughed, and set it down to her Imagination: but he was forced to admit that her description of the old woman exactly fitted the appearance his mother. It was just in that way she had been used to drees when her wort for the day was done.

Nine months after the death of the women’s husband her father died: and from that time the apparition of the old woman did not again appear.

The demise of the Outwood Grandstand

A short piece from just before the First World War on the theft of lead off a roof. Not just any old roof though, this was the former Grandstand building for the Wakefield-Outwood racecourse at Lawns, Carr Gate. Dating from the mid-18th century, the building was reputedly designed by architect John Carr.

Leeds Mercury
Saturday 13 December 1913

YORKSHIRE NEWS IN BRIEF

Wakefield, yesterday, John Winter, teamer, Outwood, was sent to prison for four months for having stolen a quantity of lead, value £6 10s. from the roof the old grand-stand at Outwood.

The theft left the old building open to the elements, leading to its demolition a decade later.

Ratepayers’ election descends into brawl

Manchester Evening News
Saturday 7 April 1894

FREE FIGHT AT A RATEPAYERS’ MEETING

Last night the annual meeting of the ratepayers of the hamlet of Wrenthorpe, near Wakefield, was held for the purpose of electing highway surveyors for the forthcoming year. The large schoolroom was so packed that many could not gain admittance, and there must have been close upon 600 men present, mostly miners. There seemed to be two parties – one consisting of the supporters of Messrs Charles Holden and Elijah Farrer, who were declared duly elected as surveyors, and the other of Mr William Morris, the defeated candidate. When the result of the voting was announced a poll was demanded on behalf of Mr Morris, but the necessary deposit not being forthcoming, this was refused. Thereupon a free fight ensued. One of the supporters of the defeated candidate picked a chair and struck another man with it, and this was the signal for a free fight in one corner of the room. All the miners rushed to this one corner, and things presented serious aspect for a minute or so, but through the timely arrival of the local police, what might have proved quite riot was prevented.

Big extension to Carr Gate Hospital

Sheffield Daily Telegraph
Thursday 1 December 1904

SMALLPOX HOSPITAL FOR WAKEFIELD

An inquiry, conducted by members of the West Riding Sanitary Committee, was held at the County Hall, Wakefield, yesterday. The business was in connection with an application by the Wakefield and District Smallpox Isolation Hospital Committee, for the approval of the County Council to the acquisition by the Hospital Committee of a site upon which to erect an isolation hospital, and for a loan of £6,000 to cover the cost. Alderman H Dunn presided.

The land referred to consists of about 14 acres, and is situate near Carr Gate, in the township of Outwood and in the parish of Wakefield. The period of repayment was fixed by the applicants at 20 years. The case for the applicants was conducted by Mr Herbert Beaumont, clerk to the Hospital Committee, and witnesses called were Alderman Hudson (chairman), Dr Jackson (medical officer of the existing Carr Gate Hospital for general infectious diseases), Dr Gibson (Officer of Health for Wakefield) and Mr Frank Massie.

There was opposition, and the scheme seemed to very favourably received by County Council representatives, who report in due course.

Sudden death at Melbourne House lodge

Grantham Journal
Saturday 9 September 1871

SHOCKING OCCURRENCE NEAR WAKEFIELD

On Saturday night, shortly before eight o’clock, Mr John Buckley, who occupies the farm buildings connected with Melbourne House, better known as “Prophet Wroe’s Temple”, situate at Wrenthorpe, near Wakefield, sent his son with a newspaper to one of the lodges in the Temple grounds, the sole occupant of which was an old Scotchwoman, named Jane Foreman Campbell. The young man returned, saying he could not make the old woman (who always kept the door locked) hear. Mr Buckley then went to the lodge, and on effecting an entrance perceived a strong smell of burning. On making an examination of the premises he found the old woman lying on the floor near her armchair. Her clothes were all destroyed, her body charred and adhering to the floor, and the seat of her chair was burnt out. It is supposed that whilst mending her stockings on the Thursday evening (which was the last time she was seen alive) her clothes caught fire, and she was burnt to death. She was seventy-nine years of age, was the widow of Mr Cotes Campbell, assistant-keeper at the Register House, Edinburgh, and mother of Mr W Campbell, C.E., Newcastle-on-Tyne, to whom she frequently wrote up to about a fortnight ago. An inquest has been held before Mr T Taylor, and a verdict of “Accidentally burnt” returned.