Gee! Lost plots and wet blankets

This one’s either attrocious reporting, bad typesetting or both.

Leeds Times
Saturday 1 May 1841

AN INCORRIGIBLE ROGUE

On Monday last, Gee was committed take his trial for stealing a blanket, belonging to Mr Hill, of Wrenthorpe, near Wakefield. Last week, Gee’s period of confinement in Wakefield House of Correction for offence, expired, and on his road to Bradford, he contrived strip a hedge of the blanket in question. He was seen to come into Bradford with something suspicious tied up bundle, and was seized Charles Ingham, police officer, and the bundle searched, when it was found to contain a wet blanket, and after some inquiries the owner was found, and identified it by several marks.

18410501IncorrigibleRogue

The demise of the Outwood Grandstand

A short piece from just before the First World War on the theft of lead off a roof. Not just any old roof though, this was the former Grandstand building for the Wakefield-Outwood racecourse at Lawns, Carr Gate. Dating from the mid-18th century, the building was reputedly designed by architect John Carr.

Leeds Mercury
Saturday 13 December 1913

YORKSHIRE NEWS IN BRIEF

Wakefield, yesterday, John Winter, teamer, Outwood, was sent to prison for four months for having stolen a quantity of lead, value £6 10s. from the roof the old grand-stand at Outwood.

The theft left the old building open to the elements, leading to its demolition a decade later.

Fracas at Kirkhamgate pub

Leeds Times
Saturday 21 May 1881

TURNING A LANDLORD OUT OF HIS OWN HOUSE AND TAKING POSSESSION

Yesterday, at the Wakefield Court House, nine Lofthouse colliers were charged with damaging the property of William Smith, landlord of the Gardeners’ Arms [Lindale Lane], Kirkhamgate. It appeared from the statement of Mr Lodge and the evidence of the witnesses, that on Saturday, the 7th instant, a pigeon match took place near complainant’s house, between two men named Pickersgill and Steele. Some dispute occurred, and afterwards a crowd of men came into Smith’s house. After they had been there some time, a disturbance took place, Littlewood, it was alleged, being the ringleader, and almost immediately afterwards glasses and pots were thrown about the place The landlord tried to quell the disturbance, on which two men took hold of him by the shoulder and actually pushed him out of his own house by the back door. They ran him up the garden, and his wife went for the police, on which the mob took possession of the premises. While the landlord was in the garden stones were thrown at him, and when he got back, after the crowed had gone away, he found the place in utter confusion, and eighteen glasses and ten pint pots were broken. Three or four holes were cut in the back door and the furniture was more or less broken. Mr Lodge added that when he was first consulted it was a question whether the prisoners ought not to be indicted for a riot, but it was decided to go on with the case of wilful damage – the complainant estimating the damage at the sum of 21s. 6d. – Two of the accused were discharged, and the others fined 5s. and costs.

Ratepayers’ election descends into brawl

Manchester Evening News
Saturday 7 April 1894

FREE FIGHT AT A RATEPAYERS’ MEETING

Last night the annual meeting of the ratepayers of the hamlet of Wrenthorpe, near Wakefield, was held for the purpose of electing highway surveyors for the forthcoming year. The large schoolroom was so packed that many could not gain admittance, and there must have been close upon 600 men present, mostly miners. There seemed to be two parties – one consisting of the supporters of Messrs Charles Holden and Elijah Farrer, who were declared duly elected as surveyors, and the other of Mr William Morris, the defeated candidate. When the result of the voting was announced a poll was demanded on behalf of Mr Morris, but the necessary deposit not being forthcoming, this was refused. Thereupon a free fight ensued. One of the supporters of the defeated candidate picked a chair and struck another man with it, and this was the signal for a free fight in one corner of the room. All the miners rushed to this one corner, and things presented serious aspect for a minute or so, but through the timely arrival of the local police, what might have proved quite riot was prevented.

Miners scrap at Silcoates

Yorkshire Evening Post
Friday 1 July 1892

PUGILISTS BOUND OVER AT WAKEFIELD

To-day, at the West Riding Court, Wakefield, James Jackson, miner, Bragg Lane End, and Joseph Farrer, miner, Brandicarr, were bound over their own recognisances of £5 to keep the for six months, and ordered to pay 18s costs each, on charge of committing breach the peace by fighting. The offence took place at Silcoates on the 18th ult., and describing the fight, the Rev W Field, headmaster Silcoates Hall, said the two men were stripped to the waist, and were very furious indeed, being half covered with blood. They were surrounded by a ring of people.

Suspected arson over 150 years ago

What with all the problems Daniel Milton caused Prophet Wroe in 1861 – claiming ownership of Melbourne House, preaching to thousands on Bradford Road, covering the walls of Wroe’s property with posters, and attempting to blow up one of the lodges it’s surprising the authorities didn’t try to pin these cases of arson on him.

Bradford Observer
Thursday 6 June 1861

SUPPOSED INCENDIARISM

About midnight yesterday week, a stack of wheat, situated at Bragg Lane End, about two-and-a-half miles from Wakefield, was discovered to be on fire, and there being but little water, it had to burn itself out. The damage done was about £35, which will fall on the owner, Mr Thomas Button. Again at midnight on Friday, another fire was discovered not far from the same place. This time the site was the stackyard of Mr James Henry Carr, farmer, the land belonging to “Prophet” Wroe, who is the leader of the Southcotian [sic] sect, and whose mansion (the centre of the earth) is in the neighbourhood. There were in the stackyard two wheat stacks, one straw stack, and one oat stack and in the adjoining shed, a large quantity of implements, besides forty loads of wheat. Again there was no water (except what could be got from a well in the yard), and so the best use was made of buckets, it being deemed useless to send for the engines from Wakefield. The result was the fire burnt on practically unchecked; on Saturday, at a late hour in the morning, it was not extinguished. The shed and its contents were destroyed, and nearly all the produce in the stacks. Mr Carr estimates his loss at £500, but he is insured (whether to the full extent or not we could not gather) in the Yorkshire Office. The most deplorable circumstance connected with both these fires is that they must have been the work of incendiaries.

Attack on Italian

Leeds Times
Saturday 4 September 1880

A CRUEL “ICONOCLAST”

At the Wakefield Court House, yesterday, a rough-looking fellow, named William Ashton, a labourer, of Potovens, was charged with breaking three images, the property of an Italian lad, Jaccheri Luigi. Mr J J Dunne acted as interpreter, complainant being able to speak French. He stated that on the 24th ult., while on the Bradford Road, on his way to Wakefield, and carrying the images, he met a waggon, in which was defendant and five others. As he passed them defendant threw stones at him, and broke the images. He was quite positive that defendant was the person. Ashton denied that he committed the damage. The Court held the charge proved, and with fine and costs, and allowing complainant 6s. damages, defendant was ordered to pay £1 or ten days.

1890s child neglect at Engine Fold

Leeds Times
Saturday 12 January 1895

THE CHILDREN OF TOTTY

At Wakefield, yesterday, Mr Wordsworth on behalf of the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, made an application in respect of the custody of five children belonging to the Old Engine Fold, Kirkhamgate. It transpired that on Wednesday Inspector Smith visited the house of a man named Joseph Totty, who, it was stated, lived with a single woman named Emma Willoughby, and there found five children, who, as well as the house, were in a dreadfully filthy condition. There was very little food in the house, the mother was absent, and there was scarcely any fire. The three boys had nothing on but shirts and trousers, and the baby was rolling on the floor naked. Their clothing, as well as two beds upstairs, was very filthy. The Bench ordered the children to remain in the workhouse until Monday when the case has to be dealt with.

Leeds Times
Saturday 19 January 1895

CHILDREN OF SHAME
SHOCKING NEGLECT AT WAKEFIELD

On Monday, at Wakefield, Emma Willoughby and a man named Joseph Totty, who have lived together, were charged with neglecting their five illegitimate children.

It seemed that the house occupied by the defendants, at Alverthorpe, being visited in October last, and again last week, it was found to be in an indescribably filthy state. The children were insufficiently clad and covered with dirt, sores, and filth, and there was very little bread and coals in the house.

Each defendant was sent to prison for two months.

The chips are down

Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer
Tuesday 30 May 1899

A WHIT MONDAY ENTERPRISE: SINGULAR GAME OF CHANCE

At Wakefield yesterday George Herriot, fish and chipped potato dealer, Potovens, was ordered to pay 12s. 6d. for using a striking machine in such a manner as to make it a game of chance.

It appeared that on Whit Monday the defendant had his machine on the highway at Potovens and took coppers from children, who were awarded prizes of fish and potatoes if the iron reached the inked numbers which had been added opposite to those painted upon it.

Wroes’ burglary: the miscarriage of justice

Picking up on the story of the three men convicted in August 1842 for the burglary at Brandy Carr House, and their sentence of transportation to Australia...

Leeds Intelligencer
Saturday 17 August 1844

INNOCENT PARTIES TRANSPORTED

Our readers will remember that about two years ago, the house of Prophet Wroe, of Wakefield, was broken into and a silver watch stolen; also, that three men, called Benjamin and John Pickersgill and James Ramsden, were tried for the robbery at York Assizes, in August, 1842, and transported for ten years. It now appears, however, that the men were in no manner connected with the robbery, and are perfectly innocent of it. This information has been obtained from James Hudson, now a convict at York Castle, who has made a voluntary confession to the Governor of the Castle, by which it appears that the robbery was committed by himself and five other men, whose names he gives; he details the proceedings on the night of the robbery, and what was done with the property. We trust the Magistrates will take measures by which these innocent men will be restored to their homes.

Shocking that what we would consider a major news story, although covered in many of the papers, is tucked away in seemingly random ‘local news’ type columns. And that’s it, there’s no further coverage, nothing about when the men did return home. A very different news agenda to that of today.