Sudden death at Melbourne House lodge

Grantham Journal
Saturday 9 September 1871

SHOCKING OCCURRENCE NEAR WAKEFIELD

On Saturday night, shortly before eight o’clock, Mr John Buckley, who occupies the farm buildings connected with Melbourne House, better known as “Prophet Wroe’s Temple”, situate at Wrenthorpe, near Wakefield, sent his son with a newspaper to one of the lodges in the Temple grounds, the sole occupant of which was an old Scotchwoman, named Jane Foreman Campbell. The young man returned, saying he could not make the old woman (who always kept the door locked) hear. Mr Buckley then went to the lodge, and on effecting an entrance perceived a strong smell of burning. On making an examination of the premises he found the old woman lying on the floor near her armchair. Her clothes were all destroyed, her body charred and adhering to the floor, and the seat of her chair was burnt out. It is supposed that whilst mending her stockings on the Thursday evening (which was the last time she was seen alive) her clothes caught fire, and she was burnt to death. She was seventy-nine years of age, was the widow of Mr Cotes Campbell, assistant-keeper at the Register House, Edinburgh, and mother of Mr W Campbell, C.E., Newcastle-on-Tyne, to whom she frequently wrote up to about a fortnight ago. An inquest has been held before Mr T Taylor, and a verdict of “Accidentally burnt” returned.

The Brooklyn bill sticker

The words ‘Stick no bills on these premises’ are carved in stone on the boundary wall of Melbourne House, near the lodge at the corner of Bradford Road/Brandy Carr Road. The inscription dates from the early 1860s when ‘Judge’ Daniel Milton was daubing the walls with posters, attempting to assert his claim to the Mansion.

Leeds Mercury
Tuesday 15 December 1863

THE “PROMISED SHILOH” IN THE WAKEFIELD COURT HOUSE

Yesterday, at the Wakefield Court House, before Colonel Smyth, MP, Mr H W Stansfeld, and Mr G H Westerman, an American named Daniel Milton, who is connected with the Southcottian sect and who appears to call himself “the Promised Shiloh”, was charged with, on the 7th December, wilfully and maliciously committing damage, injury, and spoil to and upon the property of the executors of John Wroe, deceased. Mr Barratt appeared in support of the complaint. It appeared that notwithstanding a notice to the contrary which is cut in stone on the boundary walls of Melbourne House, the residence of the late John Wroe, at Wrenthorpe, near Wakefield, the defendant, on the day in question, posted certain bills on the property. It may perhaps be remembered that about two years ago the defendant was in this neighbourhood, and that then he made some kind of claim with regard to Melbourne House.

The defendant did not deny that he had posted bills, but said that when he was in the court before, he told the bench that the property in question was joint-stock; and for proof he produced the records of the church, which, however, were not received. It had cost him expense in going across the Atlantic, and two years of privation, and having now sufficient proof he had posted the following circular:-

“Important notice! – Christian Israelite Church, Wakefield, 7th of 12th month, 1863. – All believers In the Divine visitation of Joanna Southcott, and the visitations of George Turner, William Show, John Wroe, and the ‘coming of Shiloh’, throughout the island of Great Britain and the British provinces, who have subscribed towards the building of ‘Israel’s Mansion’, in Wrenthorpe, and who have not signed over the said subscription to either John Wroe, John Laden Bishop, or Benjamin Eddowes, are requested to send their names and addresses, with the amount of their subscriptions, with immediate dispatch to Wakefield, in Yorkshire, England. Direct to ‘Premised Shiloh’, or ‘Perfect Gospel Advocate’. By order of the President of Church. J.A.J.”

If he were called on for his defence, it was “the munition of rocks”, “the law of Moses”, and he wanted his accusers to be brought, that he might question them as to their right to distress him further.

Colonel Smyth said that the defendant had committed an offence against the statute law of this country, and they had nothing to do with the law of Moses. The defendant: “I am president of the Christian Israelite Church.” The Bench inflicted a fine of 10s., with 21s. expenses additional, or, in default, fourteen days’ imprisonment. Defendant: “I have been used to be[ing] in prison for defending my rights; I can go again.”

Local photographs in old newspapers

The newspaper archives has only come up with half a dozen photographs relating to the Wrenthorpe area – and three of these are of Silcoates. The first is of the last toll bar in the district.

Leeds Mercury
Saturday 13 July 1929

SILCOATES OLD TOLL-BAR

In close proximity to the famous Silcoates School, this reminder of old coaching days is still in use, and is one of the few surviving toll-bars in the West Riding.

The image is of an unnamed man with a white beard and hat standing in front of the gate.

19290713SilcoatesTollBar

Pictures in other newspapers:

Yorkshire Evening Post
Wednesday 1 May 1935

BLOSSOM TIME IN THE ORCHARD

Caption: A scene at Wrenthorpe, near Wakefield.

Unfortunately the orchard image is too indistinct to show here.

Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer
Wednesday 17 July 1940

PLAYING FIELDS NO LONGER

Caption: Boys at Silcoates School, Wakefield, digging their playing fields in preparation for food growing.

Leeds Mercury
Tuesday 6 June 1926

A DIVINELY INSPIRED MANSION

Caption: Prophet’s Mansion, at Wrenthorpe, near Wakefield, built by Prophet John Wroe, who died many years ago. He knew nothing of architecture, and it is said that his plans were divinely inspired. The house is now inhabited by the Prophet’s great-grandson, who confidently awaits his return in the flesh. The second picture shows the novel sundial crowning the house.

19260608MelbourneHouse1

19260608MelbourneHouse2

Sheffield Daily Telegraph
Friday 2 October 1908

SILCOATES SCHOOL

On the other side will be found a picture of the ceremony in connection with the opening of the new Silcoates School, the celebrated Congregational college. The new building replaces the edifice that was burnt down some time back. The school was opened by Mr Runciman, and the picture shows Mr G H Baines, JP, one of the trustees, handing the Minister of Education the key. Mrs Runciman will be seen holding a bouquet. At the table is seated Mr Theodore Taylor, MP, while next him is Mr John McLaren, one of the trustees. Immediately beneath this picture is one showing the new school buildings.

19081002Silcoates1

19081002Silcoates2

The Wroes’ windfall

When ‘Prophet’ John Wroe’s bachelor nephew Peter died in 1893, a dispute over his will ensued. The retired farmer was the son of Wroe’s younger brother Joseph. Much light was made in the press about how Peter Wroe supposedly began his working life ‘hauling coals’. Far from the truth of course, as his father had farming and mining business interests and he was favoured over his elder notorious brother. In the late 19th century Peter was living off his investments at a farm in Methley with his spinster sister who died a couple of years before him.

Norwich Mercury
Saturday 6 July 1895

MR PETER WROE

Deceased, was a good example of the cobbler who sticks to his last. He began life by hauling coals. He saved money at this invested it in coal-mines, and his colliery shares are now worth £20,000. But there are relatives who declare that Mr Peter Wroe was of unsound testamentary capacity, whilst others who were “remembered” attest his perfect soundness. Thus some of the money made by hauling coals is on its way to the gentlemen who practise the Probate Division.

The Sheffield evening paper gets straight to the point, explaining how the estate is to be shared out.

Sheffield Evening Telegraph
Saturday 6 July 1895

THE METHLEY WILL CASE
LIST OF LEGATEES

The agreement come to in the High Court of Chancery to the wills of the late Mr Peter Wroe, of Methley, was that the claimant under the first will should withdraw his opposition on payment of £1,400, and that the second or last will of the deceased should hold good. The result of this will be that the sum of about £20,000 will be divided into four shares, as follows:- One-fourth to Mrs Sarai Teale widow, daughter of the late Prophet Wroe, formerly of the Carr Gate Mansion; one-fourth to the executors the late Susanna Wilson, of Ash Villa, St John’s, Wakefield: one-fourth to the three children of Mr Benjamin Wroe, namely, Mr James Wroe (Carr Gate), Mrs Brine (formerly of Brighton, now of St John’s, Wakefield), and Mr Joseph Wroe (Manchester); and the last fourth to the three children of Maria Tempest, of Low Moor. We understand, however, it will be necessary to take the opinion the Court as to whether the second will, worded, will include the children of Benjamin Wroe and Maria Tempest, and if the Court decides the negative the whole estate will then divided between Mrs Teale and the representatives of Mrs Wilson in equal shares, as they are the only two children of the testator’s brothers and sisters now living. The beneficiaries under the will are all people in humble circumstances, and regard the legacies as windfalls.

One thing’s for sure, most of these people were not ‘in humble circumstances’.

 

Ben Wroe: the facts (well almost)

Here’s an odd piece from a Suffolk paper in 1937. It’s on a page crammed with strange facts. Pity it doesn’t really get it right.

Framlingham Weekly News
Saturday 31 July 1937

BOY LEADS SECT

In the colliery village of East Ardsley, a few miles from Leeds, lives a nine-year-old boy who is the head of one of the strangest religious sects in the country. He is the great-great-grandson the “Prophet” Wroe, founder of the Christian Israelite movement, which, in its heyday, had followers throughout the West Riding. Members of the sect were well-known, because all male members were required to wear their hair long and to grow a beard. Their teaching was “Belief the law and the Gospel.” The boy, who became head of the movement following the death of father, John Wroe, in a road accident, wears his hair in two long plaits, which reach over his shoulders. He lives with his mother at The Mansion, a residence which has been in the family for generations, and follows the faith his forefathers. The Mansion, with farmlands, was left in entail for the prophet’s descendants so long there should heir and a pair of slippers and a vacant chair in readiness for the founder of the movement, who, it is believed, will one day return.

Silcoates School pupil Benjamin Wroe wasn’t nine but would have been about 15 when this was published. He didn’t live at the Mansion as it had been sold to the Christian Israelite Church the previous year and his mother had died three years before. Ben Wroe was killed in Normandy in 1944.

 

Magistrates give James Wroe the needle

Controversies involving immunisation campaigns are nothing new. Around 120 years before the MMR arguments in the late 1990s, ‘Prophet’ John Wroe’s heir, James, is up before local magistrates for not vaccinating his child, presumably against small pox.

Edinburgh Evening News
Saturday 1 February 1879

THE BAD EFFECTS VACCINATION

Four persons in well-to-do circumstances, residing in Wakefield and the district, were summoned yesterday before the burgh and West Riding magistrates by the vaccination officer for neglecting have their children vaccinated…

Mr Wroe, of Melbourne House, Carr Gate, and son [sic] of the late “Prophet Wroe,” the leader the followers of Johanna Southcotte, was charged with a similar offence. Mr Wroe said that vaccination was contrary to the law of Moses, and as he had religious and conscientious, objections to it, refused to obey the law. He was ordered to have his child vaccinated, and to pay 15s. for costs.

Jailed for dodging US Civil War draft

A great article from the Leeds Times: information on ‘Prophet’ John Wroe’s demise, the aftermath at Melbourne House and, most intriguingly of all, the latest troubles facing ‘Judge’ Daniel Milton.

As we’ve already heard, Brooklyn’s Daniel Milton spent much of the last 40 years of his life protesting against the Wroes, keeping the local police and courts busy, and even served time in Wakefield Prison. But on a trip home in the autumn of 1864, when he turns out to vote in the US general election, he lands up in jail for spending too much time in Wrenthorpe instead of enlisting to fight for the Union.

Leeds Times
Saturday 17 December 1864

THE “SAINTS’ ” DISPUTED INHERITANCE AT WRENTHORPE

John Wroe, the ignorant old man who falsely and wickedly designated himself a Prophet, died in Australia, in Feb, 1863, after falsifying his own prediction in this respect, for he had declared that he should return to England in the flesh, remain here for four years, and be then put to a violent death, only to re-appear at the Temple in West Ardsley for his permanent heavenly residence upon earth. We really thought that the imposture he propagated had long since exploded, and can only express our regret that such is not the case.

Our readers will remember that in March, 1864, we duly detailed the steps which had been taken by Daniel Milton – who calls himself “the Promised Shiloh” and “the Head of the Church” – to recover possession of the Saints’ Inheritance at Wrenthorpe, on the ground that it had been built with the money of the disciples, and was intended to be their home when the earthly Millennium comes to pass, and how Daniel soon found himself in the Lion’s Den – otherwise the Wakefield House of Correction – for obstructing the executors of John Wroe’s will in the execution of their duty. Since that period, the farms, farming stock, houses, and the elegant articles of furniture appertaining unto Melbourne Temple, have been disposed of by public auction, for the benefit of the kith and kin of the deceased “prophet”: and within the “hallowed walls” of the structure there is now nothing to testify to its departed glories except two faithful female adherents of Wroe’s, who wander about the tenement sorely distressed in mind owing to the trouble that has fallen upon Israel, but who still firmly believe that John will re-appear on February 4th, 1865. Whether his resuscitation is to be merely spiritual or of the flesh, fleshly, is not clear even to the mental vision of these sorely afflicted females. But they bide their time, holding loyally to their creed, and will be prepared to welcome Wroe even if he comes under the questionable shape of a spiritual medium, rather than in propria persona, and on board one of the excellent mail steamers via Point de Galle, Aden, and Southampton.

In the meantime the man who was the thorn in the side of the prophet and his adherents has got into trouble at New York. Daniel Milton, “the promised Shiloh”, unluckily took it into his head to go and visit his mother, east of the empire city, just at the time when the draft for the army was being conducted therein. For the moment he was not missed, inasmuch as he has latterly spent much of his time in England, and on the Atlantic; but he was discovered and “brought to book” when he turned up in his ward on the 8th November to vote for old Abe Lincoln. For this offence of evading the draft he was sent to the Bastile, Greenpoint, New York, where he remained at the date of the latest advices. But he requests us to state that he intends to lecture in the neighbourhood of “Israel’s mansion”, at Wrenthorpe, on Whit Sunday next [4 June 1865], on “the Law of Moses, English Law, and Lawyers”. We freely give Mr Milton the benefit of our columns for this announcement, and do not anticipate that he is likely to be disturbed by the reappearance of the “old familiar form of the man whose rest he had so much disquieted” – we mean the deceased “prophet”, John Wroe.