110 blog posts later…

The ghost story from a 1937 edition of the Yorkshire Evening Post was the last ‘Wrenthorpe in the news’ for now.

After 110 blog posts, 40,000 words, and 37 different newspaper titles, we’ve exhausted the more interesting Wrenthorpe-related material currently available online via the British Newspaper Archive. We’ll now have to wait until more newspaper titles, particularly the Wakefield-based ones are uploaded.

In the meantime this blog will be back in the autumn with more information behind some of the stories featured, as well as looking at Wrenthorpe-related documents to be found at other archives such as the National Archives at Kew.

 

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A Wrenthorpe ghost story

Yorkshire Evening Post
Saturday 11 September 1937

DIARY OF A YORKSHIREMAN
THE LITTLE OLD WOMAN

I am informed that the truth of the following story is vouched for by a miner’s widow living in Wrenthorpe.

Seven years ago her husband died after a pit accident, and went live an old stone house Wrenthorpe village to be near her father, whose health was failing. Often the early days of her bereavement she would sit the firelight when her days’ work was done, staring into the fire, and whenever she looked across to the armchair on the other side the hearth she could see a figure sitting in it. It was figure of an old woman, with white and rosy cheeks. On her head was white cap with heliotrope bow in the front. A white frill edged the neck of her bodice, and white trills showed at her wrists. She wore a little black satin apron edged with lace, and her hands were folded on her lap.

Every time the widow sat alone in the firelight the little old woman would appear in the armchair opposite. It naturally made her nervous, and she would get up and light the gas. When she told her father about the apparition, he only laughed, and set it down to her Imagination: but he was forced to admit that her description of the old woman exactly fitted the appearance his mother. It was just in that way she had been used to drees when her wort for the day was done.

Nine months after the death of the women’s husband her father died: and from that time the apparition of the old woman did not again appear.

The demise of the Outwood Grandstand

A short piece from just before the First World War on the theft of lead off a roof. Not just any old roof though, this was the former Grandstand building for the Wakefield-Outwood racecourse at Lawns, Carr Gate. Dating from the mid-18th century, the building was reputedly designed by architect John Carr.

Leeds Mercury
Saturday 13 December 1913

YORKSHIRE NEWS IN BRIEF

Wakefield, yesterday, John Winter, teamer, Outwood, was sent to prison for four months for having stolen a quantity of lead, value £6 10s. from the roof the old grand-stand at Outwood.

The theft left the old building open to the elements, leading to its demolition a decade later.

Fracas at Kirkhamgate pub

Leeds Times
Saturday 21 May 1881

TURNING A LANDLORD OUT OF HIS OWN HOUSE AND TAKING POSSESSION

Yesterday, at the Wakefield Court House, nine Lofthouse colliers were charged with damaging the property of William Smith, landlord of the Gardeners’ Arms [Lindale Lane], Kirkhamgate. It appeared from the statement of Mr Lodge and the evidence of the witnesses, that on Saturday, the 7th instant, a pigeon match took place near complainant’s house, between two men named Pickersgill and Steele. Some dispute occurred, and afterwards a crowd of men came into Smith’s house. After they had been there some time, a disturbance took place, Littlewood, it was alleged, being the ringleader, and almost immediately afterwards glasses and pots were thrown about the place The landlord tried to quell the disturbance, on which two men took hold of him by the shoulder and actually pushed him out of his own house by the back door. They ran him up the garden, and his wife went for the police, on which the mob took possession of the premises. While the landlord was in the garden stones were thrown at him, and when he got back, after the crowed had gone away, he found the place in utter confusion, and eighteen glasses and ten pint pots were broken. Three or four holes were cut in the back door and the furniture was more or less broken. Mr Lodge added that when he was first consulted it was a question whether the prisoners ought not to be indicted for a riot, but it was decided to go on with the case of wilful damage – the complainant estimating the damage at the sum of 21s. 6d. – Two of the accused were discharged, and the others fined 5s. and costs.

Ratepayers’ election descends into brawl

Manchester Evening News
Saturday 7 April 1894

FREE FIGHT AT A RATEPAYERS’ MEETING

Last night the annual meeting of the ratepayers of the hamlet of Wrenthorpe, near Wakefield, was held for the purpose of electing highway surveyors for the forthcoming year. The large schoolroom was so packed that many could not gain admittance, and there must have been close upon 600 men present, mostly miners. There seemed to be two parties – one consisting of the supporters of Messrs Charles Holden and Elijah Farrer, who were declared duly elected as surveyors, and the other of Mr William Morris, the defeated candidate. When the result of the voting was announced a poll was demanded on behalf of Mr Morris, but the necessary deposit not being forthcoming, this was refused. Thereupon a free fight ensued. One of the supporters of the defeated candidate picked a chair and struck another man with it, and this was the signal for a free fight in one corner of the room. All the miners rushed to this one corner, and things presented serious aspect for a minute or so, but through the timely arrival of the local police, what might have proved quite riot was prevented.

Big extension to Carr Gate Hospital

Sheffield Daily Telegraph
Thursday 1 December 1904

SMALLPOX HOSPITAL FOR WAKEFIELD

An inquiry, conducted by members of the West Riding Sanitary Committee, was held at the County Hall, Wakefield, yesterday. The business was in connection with an application by the Wakefield and District Smallpox Isolation Hospital Committee, for the approval of the County Council to the acquisition by the Hospital Committee of a site upon which to erect an isolation hospital, and for a loan of £6,000 to cover the cost. Alderman H Dunn presided.

The land referred to consists of about 14 acres, and is situate near Carr Gate, in the township of Outwood and in the parish of Wakefield. The period of repayment was fixed by the applicants at 20 years. The case for the applicants was conducted by Mr Herbert Beaumont, clerk to the Hospital Committee, and witnesses called were Alderman Hudson (chairman), Dr Jackson (medical officer of the existing Carr Gate Hospital for general infectious diseases), Dr Gibson (Officer of Health for Wakefield) and Mr Frank Massie.

There was opposition, and the scheme seemed to very favourably received by County Council representatives, who report in due course.

The Gate or the Star: which pub gets the push?

Leeds Mercury
Tuesday 3 March 1925

PUBLIC HOUSES TO GO

At the adjourned licensing sessions for the Lower Agbrigg Division at Wakefield yesterday the magistrates referred to the Compensation Authority the licences the Moulders’ Arms, Middlestown and the Prospect Inn, Altofts (beer houses), on the ground of redundancy.

The licences of the Gate Inn and Star Inn, Kirkhamgate, were both renewed for one year on the definite understanding that one of these licences must eventually go.

Leeds Mercury
Saturday 4 June 1927

LICENCES REFERRED

The following licence was referred for compensation without opposition Gate Inn, Kirkhamgate, Ardsley; licensee, W Hornshaw; owners, John Smith and Co.